C++ Team Blog

The latest in C++, Visual Studio, VS Code, and vcpkg from the MSFT C++ team

CMake support in Visual Studio – what’s new in 2017 15.3 Preview

We are excited to announce the first preview release of Visual Studio 2017 15.3 update in conjunction with our Build 2017 conference!  This preview includes two new features of interest to developers utilizing CMake.  Support for the CMake Ninja generator and CMake CTest integration in the IDE. Please download the preview and try out the ...

Android and iOS development with C++ in Visual Studio

When it comes to building mobile applications, many developers write most or a part of the apps in C++. Why? Those who are building computationally intensive apps such as games and physics simulations choose C++ for its unparalleled performance, and the others choose C++ for its cross-platform nature and the ability to leverage existing C/C++ ...

CMake support in Visual Studio – what’s new in 2017 15.2 update

Today’s preview release of Visual Studio 2017 15.2 update comes with several improvements and new features in CMake Tools for Visual Studio – recently updated to cover 15.2.  We have upgraded the included version of CMake to 3.7.2 and enhanced the discoverability of features in the CMake menu.  This update also includes bugfixes for ...

Bring your C++ code to Visual Studio

C++ has been around for a long time and throughout its history many tools have been built to make life easier for C++ developers. This has led to a diverse C++ ecosystem in terms of the editing tools, build systems, coding conventions, and C++ libraries that we use in our day-to-day work. As a C++ developer, you are probably accustomed to ...

Binary Compatibility and Pain-free Upgrade: Why Moving to Visual Studio 2017 is almost “too easy”

Visual Studio 2017 is a major leap forward in terms of C++ functionality compared with VS 2015. We hope the new release will delight you in your day-to-day job as soon as you can upgrade. This blog post focuses on the steps needed to upgrade from Visual Studio 2015 to 2017. As promised in our BUILD 2016 talk "6 reasons to move your C++ code ...

C++ game development workload in Visual Studio 2017

Visual Studio 2017 introduces a new "Game development with C++" workload, making it easy to get tools you need for building high-quality games with C++. Whether you’re using DirectX or powerful game engines such as Unreal Engine or Cocos2d, Visual Studio can install everything you need all at once to get you started quickly. In this blog ...

Visual Studio Code C/C++ extension March 2017 Update

Last week marked an important and exciting milestone for the C/C++ extension for Visual Studio Code: this extension has been installed for over 1 million times since it shipped just a year ago! Thanks to everyone who tried it and provided us invaluable feedback to help shape the extension what it is today. But we are still early in this ...

Using C++ Resumable Functions with Libuv

Previously on this blog we have talked about Resumable Functions, and even recently we touched on the renaming of the yield keyword to co_yield in our implementation in Visual Studio 2017. I am very excited about this potential C++ standards feature, so in this blog post I wanted to share with you a real world use of it by adapting it to the ...

`yield` keyword to become `co_yield` in VS 2017

Coroutines—formerly known as “C++ resumable functions”—are one of the Technical Specifications (TS) that we have implemented in the Visual C++ compiler. We’ve supported coroutines for three years—ever since the VC++ November 2013 CTP release. If you’re using coroutines you should be aware that the keyword `yield` is being ...