Visual Studio Blog

The official source of product insight from the Visual Studio Engineering Team

What’s New in Visual Studio 2022 17.4 Preview 1

We released Visual Studio 2022 17.4 Preview 1 last week alongside the 17.3 generally available release. In this post we'll share details about some of the new capabilities in this preview and the focus of this release. Feedback from developers like you during our preview cycle is so important for us to deliver a final product that meets your ...

Git Line-staging Released!

We are excited to announce the release of Line-staging support in Visual Studio 2022. Line-staging, a.k.a. interactive staging, enables you to split your changed lines of code across different commits. Line-staging could also be utilized in reviewing your changes before committing them. Mark your changed lines or sections of code as reviewed ...

Choosing a .NET Memory Profiler in Visual Studio – part 1

Summary Visual Studio provides two great tools for analyzing and diagnosing memory issues in .NET applications: the Memory Usage profiler and .NET Object Allocation Tracking tool. While both tools are useful, it may not be obvious for new user to know which one to use when. This article aims to clarify what each tool is good for and how to ...

VisualStudio.Extensibility: A New Way to Write Extensions

Last year, we announced the first phase of a new extensibility model for Visual Studio.  This new model will make extensions easier to write and more reliable along with additional benefits such as being able to install these extensions without restarting the IDE.  Now, we’re excited to announce the second phase of the new extensibility ...

Visual Studio 2022 17.3 is now available!

We are happy to announce that Visual Studio 2022 17.3 has been released and is now generally available. At Microsoft, we thrive on getting feedback and experiences from those using Visual Studio and continually work to improve the product based on this feedback. Visual Studio 2022 17.3 comes with new features such as .NET MAUI GA tooling, ...

Differentiating Visual Studio instances

When you have multiple instances of Visual Studio open at the same time, it can be tricky to tell them apart. Especially if you’re working on different branches of the same solution, which makes them look almost identical. What if each instance could have a unique color so you could instantly tell them apart? Would you use it? The ...

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