PIX on Windows

Performance tuning and debugging for DirectX 12 games on Windows

Analyzing Win32 File IO performance in Timing Captures
Analyzing Win32 File IO performance in Timing Captures
PIX Timing Captures include an option to collect data on your title’s use of the Win32 file IO APIs to access files. The data collected for calls to APIs such as ReadFile and WriteFile include the name of the file being accessed, and the offset, size and duration of the access itself. Full callstacks for each file access are also ...
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New documentation page: Analyzing Memory usage and performance in Timing Captures
New documentation page: Analyzing Memory usage and performance in Timing Captures
Hi PIX users, Over the last few releases we've been extending our memory profiling features in Timing Captures.  I've written a new documentation page that describes how to use Timing Captures to analyze memory usage and performance.  The addition of memory data to Timing Captures replaces the separate memory capture that we removed from PIX...
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Analyzing Memory usage and performance in Timing Captures
Analyzing Memory usage and performance in Timing Captures
PIX Timing Captures include options to record information on the memory allocations and frees made while the capture is running. This memory data is used to compute a set of memory-related counters that can be graphed in the Metrics View and to build an allocation stack tree and virtual memory allocations list in the Range Details view. The...
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Capturing GPU Work
Capturing GPU Work
One of the most significant changes we’ve made in PIX-2008.26 has been to make the GPU capture process focus on capturing GPU work rather than API calls. This blog post will explain how PIX used to work, describe some of the drawbacks with this approach, how it works now, and the benefits we get from it. Hopefully, you’ll find this ...
Debugging D3D11 apps using D3D11On12
Debugging D3D11 apps using D3D11On12
PIX is designed for use with Direct3D12 applications. That said, PIX can take advantage of Windows’ ability to convert Direct3D11 API calls into Direct3D12 calls, and thereby allow you to view your Direct3D11 application as if it were Direct3D12. It’s easy to use: just click this check box here before launching your game under GPU capture...
GPU Captures: Support for D3D video
GPU Captures: Support for D3D video
PIX on Windows version 2008.26 added support for taking GPU Captures of applications that use D3D video APIs. This means that you can now use PIX to capture regions of GPU work that involve videos, such as title screens in games or videos playing in web browsers. In this blog post, we’ll talk about how PIX captures video workloads and what ...
Changes to the capture experience
Changes to the capture experience
Summary As some of you have likely noticed by now, PIX.2008-26 comes with some improvements to the overall capture and Start-Analysis experience, made possible by the rewrite of the capture layer within PIX on Windows. This is a list of the major changes – read on for a detailed explanation! API selection change - no ...
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GPU Captures: How we support placed and reserved resources
GPU Captures: How we support placed and reserved resources
Quick Links   Summary   Recap: placed and reserved resources in D3D12 In D3D12, there are three types of resources: A committed resource has its own dedicated backing memory that isn’t shared with any other resource. This makes them relatively easy for PIX to capture...
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PIX 2008.26: Performance Improvements
PIX 2008.26: Performance Improvements
Earlier today we released PIX on Windows version 2008.26, featuring a 100,000+ line rewrite of our component that takes GPU Captures. Morgan has described this release’s functional improvements in her blog post, but here we’ll take a closer look at the new performance improvements.    Recap: GPU Captures in PIX on Windows...
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