The Old New Thing

A look inside WinInet's index.dat file and changes in IE7 and Vista

My frequent bicycling buddy Ari Pernick wrote a couple of articles over on the Windows Network Development blog on the topic of the index.dat file, which appears to have gotten a bit of attention lately. This past weekend, I joined Ari and another friend in a ride along the Upper Loop of the annual Tour De Peaks bicycle ride. I'd never ...

Candidate for most obscure keyboard shortcut: Shift+F8

One of the most obscure keyboard shortcuts has got to be Shift+F8, which is used for listbox discontiguous extended selection. Man, what a mouthful. KB article Q301583 doesn't help matters by listing this keyboard shortcut under "Dialog box keyboard shortcuts" even though it isn't a dialog box keyboard shortcut. It's a listbox keyboard ...

Even more about C# anonymous methods, from the source

If you want to know still more about C# anonymous methods, you can check out the web site of Grant Richins who has an entire category devoted to anonymous methods, and he should know, since he actually implemented them. Now that CLR week is over, I'm curious what you all thought of it. Would you like to see another CLR week at some point...

The day Tully's ran out of coffee

Today, Tully's coffee shops begin offering free Wi-Fi (in shops where Wi-Fi is available). Tully's isn't as widespread as Starbucks, but it's the best of the major chain coffee shops in the Seattle area, according to a highly unscientific poll of my friends. Seeing Tully's name back in the news reminded me of an incident that occurred to one...

News Flash: Big houses also cost more to cool

Perhaps as a counterpart to the fact that big houses have bigger heating bills, NPR yesterday pointed out that bigger houses use more electricity for cooling. (NPR looks not at the "surprise" of big-house owners over the cost of energy, but rather the consequences of these big houses on the energy grid. But the headline was hard to pass up...

C# nested classes are like C++ nested classes, not Java inner classes

When you declare a class inside another class, the inner class still acts like a regular class. The nesting controls access and visibility, but not behavior. In other words, all the rules you learned about regular classes also apply to nested classes. The this keyword in an instance methods of a class (nested or not) can be used to access ...
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