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The F# development home on GitHub is now dotnet/fsharp

TL;DR We've moved the F# GitHub repository from microsoft/visualfsharp to dotnet/fsharp, as specified in the corresponding RFC. F# has a somewhat strange history in its name and brand. If we roll back the clocks to the year 2015, F# sort of had two identities. One side of this was Visual F#, or "VisualFSharp"; a product within Visual ...

Announcing F# 4.6

We're excited to announce general availability of F# 4.6 and the F# tools for Visual Studio 2019! In this post, I'll show you how to get started, explain the F# 4.6 feature set, give you an update on the F# tools for Visual Studio, and talk about what we're doing next. F# 4.6 was developed entirely via an open RFC (requests for comments) ...

Submit to the Applied F# Challenge!

This post was written by Lena Hall, a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate at Microsoft. F# Software Foundation has recently announced their new initiative — Applied F# Challenge! We encourage you to participate and send your submissions about F# on Azure through the participation form. Applied F# Challenge is a new initiative to ...

Announcing F# 4.6 Preview

F# 4.6 is now fully released. See the announcement blog post for more. We're excited to announce that Visual Studio 2019 will ship a new version of F# when it releases: F# 4.6! F# 4.6 is a smaller update to the F# language, making it a "true" point-release. As with previous versions of F#, F# 4.6 was developed entirely via an open RFC (...

Announcing F# 4.5

Today, we’re incredibly pleased to announce general availability of F# 4.5. This post will walk through the changes in F# 4.5 (just like the preview post), then show some updates to F# tooling, and finally talk a bit about where what we’re thinking about for the next F# version. Get started F# 4.5 can be acquired in two ways...

Announcing F# 4.5 Preview

Accounting for this change on Windows build servers: You may be doing one of the following things to install F# on a Windows build server. Installing the full Visual Studio IDE Installing the F# Compiler SDK MSI Neither of these options have been recommended for some time, but are still available with F# 4.1.

F# language and tools update for Visual Studio 2017 version 15.7

We’re excited to share updates about changes to F# and F# tools which shipped with the Visual Studio 2017 version 15.7 release. Let’s dive in! Type Providers now support .NET Standard For those who aren’t familiar with Type Providers, they are a feature of F# which allow you to get IntelliSense for data. When pointed at a data source, ...

F# language and tools update for Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6

With the release of Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6, we’re excited to share updates to the F# language and core library, F# tooling in Visual Studio, and infrastructure updates that concern OSS contributors. Let’s dive in! F# language and core library updates Some foundational changes for the F# language and core library have been ...

Announcing F# support for .NET Core and .NET Standard projects in Visual Studio

We're pleased to announce that Visual Studio 2017 15.5 Preview 4 now supports F# projects targeting .NET Core, .NET Standard, and .NET Framework through the .NET Core SDK. Some of you have noticed various levels of this support in the first, second, and third previews. We still had a few work items left to complete when those were released, so...

Build a web service with F# and .NET Core 2.0

Earlier this year, I wrote about an update to the roadmap for F# and .NET Core. I had mentioned that there were a number of things you could build with F# and .NET Core today, such as web services. In this post, I'll walk through building a web service with F# and .NET Core 2.0 using the Giraffe library. It's also worth noting that Giraffe ...

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