.NET Parallel Programming

All about Async/Await, System.Threading.Tasks, System.Collections.Concurrent, System.Linq, and more…

Concurrent, Multi-core Programming on Windows and .NET

Thanks to everyone who attended our PDC pre-conference session yesterday on parallelism and concurrency!  We had a wonderful turnout at the event, and David, Joe, and I all had a terrific time. Attached to this post are the slides we presented. (It turns out that the PDC site does allow you to submit an evaluation for a precon.  If ...

Q&As from the 2008 Financial Services Developer Conference

A few weeks ago, I presented on Parallel Extensions to the .NET Framework at the 6th annual Microsoft Financial Services Developer Conference (the decks from the conference are now available online).  I had a great time and a great audience, and during the presentation on Thursday I received some good questions.  Here are some of ...

Wrapping an APM implementation with Future

In a previous post, I talked about implementing the Asynchronous Programming Model pattern using Future<T> from Parallel Extensions to the .NET Framework.  It's also possible to go in the opposite direction, to create a Future<T> from an existing APM implementation.As has been shown in previous examples, in this example we'll ...

Custom parallel looping constructs

For those of you that have examined the internals of the Task Parallel Library in our December '07 CTP release, you've likely noticed that the methods on the System.Threading.Parallel type are implemented on top of System.Threading.Tasks.Task type, and that they do so taking advantage of Task's self-replicating functionality.  The idea ...

Task Parallel Library on Channel 9

Charles from Channel 9 sat down with several of us from the Parallel Computing Platform team to discuss the Task Parallel Library component of Parallel Extensions. A video of the conversation is now available on Channel9: https://channel9.msdn.com/Showpost.aspx?postid=384229. We hope you like it, and as always, feedback is ...

Recursion and Concurrency

When teaching recursion in an introductory computer science course, one of the most common examples used involves a tree data structure.  Trees are useful in this regard as they are simple and recursive in nature, with a tree's children also being trees, and allow for teaching different kinds of traversals (in-order, pre-order, post-...

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