PowerShell Team

Automating the world one-liner at a time…

New Free Windows PowerShell Quick Reference Card

I've been working with the folks over at Developer Zone on a quick reference card for PowerShell, based on my book. The card is now complete and is available as a free download. (PDF, registration required.) This is an 8-page card that covers the PowerShell language, common commands and  examples. The card was written primarily for ...
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WPF & PowerShell – Part 7 (Sharing Hosts)

Well here we are at the end of a week of WPF.  We've learned how to create basic, simple user interactive interfaces.  We've seen a brief glimmer of the golden UI layer that is WPF, and have seen how we can use PowerShell to add easy interactivity to XAML.  You've seen tricks to help you work your way through .NET code, and help...

WPF & PowerShell – Part 6 (Running Functions in the Background)

For the next part in the series, I've introduced another update to the Show-Control function you first met in Part 4.  In this update, I've added the ability to run the control you've created in a background runspace as a switch. In order to do this, Show-Control employs a neat little trick.  It actually creates a background runspace...

WPF & PowerShell – Part 5 ( Using WPF & PowerShell Modules)

In the last post we met XAML, and I gave you a core function (Show-Control) that will help you make interactive WPF controls quite nicely in PowerShell. You can see that, by using Show-Control, it is possible to reduce the size and complexity of a script that creates UI.  Today, I'll show you how to build small applications by building ...

PowerShell and WPF: WTF

A number of people are confused by the WPF/PowerShell series and are "asking WTF?".  Aaron has a blog entry, WPF and PowerShell Series - I don't get it.  Caywen left a comment on the first in posting saying, "Ugh, I could make a peanut butter and squid sandwich, but that doesn't mean you should." (I like the visual on ...

WPF & PowerShell — Part 4 (XAML & Show-Control)

We're not halfway through our week of WPF, and I'm pretty sure at this point that you have an all right grounding in the basics of WPF & PowerShell, but so far, the scripts haven't really been very much like most PowerShell scripts, and the UIs have not been like most WPF UIs.  The scripts have been a little odd because they haven't ...

WPF & PowerShell — Part 3 (Handling Events)

So far, most of the wpf and powershell scripts you have seen have seen just show you something, but don’t do anything that interactive. However, In order to make real applications you need to be able to handle events. Luckily, PowerShell can make that pretty easy. It is possible to cast a script block to an event handler. The script ...

WPF & PowerShell – Part 2 (Exploring WPF (and the rest of .NET) with Scripts)

In my previous post, I showed you how to create “Hello World” scripts using Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) and Windows PowerShell. While “Hello World” is relatively easy to write with WPF, it is only the tip of the iceberg of the types of quick user interfaces you can write. Windows Presentation Foundation provides an amazing ...

WPF & PowerShell – Part 1 ( Hello World & Welcome to the Week of WPF )

Welcome to the Week of WPF.  During the next 7 days, I’ll help show you how you can use WPF and PowerShell together. PowerShell could always script almost everything in .NET, but, prior to the recent CTP2 you could not script Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) in PowerShell. Now you can script everything that WPF can do within ...

Strict Mode: V1 Debug Tool V1 / V2 Best Practice

When we designed PowerShell we decided that we wanted to have Shell syntax and semantics because this is what was missing from the market and because it supports the ad hoc development practice that is so suited to the needs of administrators.  We also observed that most shells ran out of power pretty quickly and people had to ...
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