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Announcing F# 4.6 Preview

F# 4.6 is now fully released. See the announcement blog post for more. We're excited to announce that Visual Studio 2019 will ship a new version of F# when it releases: F# 4.6! F# 4.6 is a smaller update to the F# language, making it a "true" point-release. As with previous versions of F#, F# 4.6 was developed entirely via an open RFC (...

F# language and tools update for Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6

With the release of Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6, we’re excited to share updates to the F# language and core library, F# tooling in Visual Studio, and infrastructure updates that concern OSS contributors. Let’s dive in! F# language and core library updates Some foundational changes for the F# language and core library have been ...

Announcing F# support for .NET Core and .NET Standard projects in Visual Studio

We're pleased to announce that Visual Studio 2017 15.5 Preview 4 now supports F# projects targeting .NET Core, .NET Standard, and .NET Framework through the .NET Core SDK. Some of you have noticed various levels of this support in the first, second, and third previews. We still had a few work items left to complete when those were released, so...

Build a web service with F# and .NET Core 2.0

Earlier this year, I wrote about an update to the roadmap for F# and .NET Core. I had mentioned that there were a number of things you could build with F# and .NET Core today, such as web services. In this post, I'll walk through building a web service with F# and .NET Core 2.0 using the Giraffe library. It's also worth noting that Giraffe ...

F# and .NET Core Roadmap Update

Now that .NET Core 2.0 has been released, we wanted to take some time to talk about F# and .NET Core. F# and .NET Core 1.0 F# has been supported on .NET Core and .NET Standard since their 1.0 releases. In the months leading up to the release of .NET Core 1.0, Enrico Sada from the F# community worked with us and other teams at Microsoft to add...

.NET Fringe: A Great Role Model for Community Oriented Conferences

A few of us just went to a smaller .NET conference in Portland, called .NET Fringe. For me, it was the third time I attended .NET Fringe. I've realized that this conference has gained a special place in my heart, so thought it would be worthwhile writing up why that is. My goal isn't to convince you to attend .NET Fringe per se, but to ...
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Why you should use F#

Why you should use F# This post was written by Phillip Carter and Mads Torgersen. Both work on languages on the .NET team. At Build 2017, we presented a tech talk entitled "Why You Should Use F#". However, not everyone can attend Build, and many attendees were unable to find a position in the room where they could adequately hear us. You ...

The .NET Language Strategy

The .NET Language Strategy I am constantly aware of the enormous impact our language investments have on so many people's daily lives. Our languages are a huge strength of the .NET platform, and a primary factor in people choosing to bet on it - and stay on it. I've been here on the .NET languages team at Microsoft for more than a decade, and...
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The week in .NET – .NET Foundation – Serilog – Super Dungeon Bros

To read last week's post, see The week in .NET – .NET, ASP.NET, EF Core 1.1 Preview 1 – On .NET on EF Core 1.1 – Changelog – FluentValidation – Reverse: Time Collapse. On .NET: Martin Woodward on the .NET Foundation Last week, Martin Woodward was on the show to talk about the .NET Foundation:  This week, we'll speak with Mei-...
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