Xamarin Blog

An open source mobile platform for building Android, iOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS apps with .NET.

Using the Android Designer Split View

The ability to see the design view and layout XML at the same time, side by side, was one of our most requested features for the Android Designer. With Split View, new in the Visual Studio 2017 version 15.8 release, you can switch back & forth freely between both modes of working. Edit the layout XML to see the changes immediately previewed in the designer or make changes in the designer and see the XML update.

Get Ready for iOS 12 and Xcode 10

Support for iOS 12 and Xcode 10 to accompany Apple’s Xcode Gold Master (GM) release has just been announced! We have also published updated documentation and samples to help you quickly get started with all the latest new features. Now, build your Xamarin.iOS (and of course Xamarin.Forms for iOS) applications with Xcode 10 GM and submit your iOS 12, tvOS 12, and watchOS 5 applications to the Apple App Store.

Handling input from Apple Pencil

After months of contemplation before finally buying an Apple Pencil to go along with the iPad Pro, it turns out it is as magical as they say! This blog post describes how to use Xamarin.iOS and Visual Studio 2017 to build a signature pad app that works with Apple Pencil.

Xamarin.Forms 3.2.0 Released: Going Big with Little Things

marin.Forms 3.2.0 continues the theme of previous releases to give you big wins by making little things much easier to do. The entire version 3 series has been about reducing the friction of doing such things as positioning the Android tabs to the bottom, controlling spellcheck and capitalization and prediction on text controls. There are even trivial improvements to setting ImeOptions, coloring various elements of switches and bars, and so many more.

Watch the .NET Conf Live!

The 3-day virtual developer conference co-organized by the .NET community and Microsoft is finally here! Now the question is how and where to watch the .NET Conf which will be completely live-streamed. It is the perfect opportunity to enhance your skills, ask questions to a live audience, and get inspired for your next project.

Using Object Detection from inside your Xamarin app

Microsoft Cognitive Services provide a great way to get started with AI without being a machine learning or data science expert. A common favorite of cognitive services is the Custom Vision Service. The first version of this service allowed you to easily build an image classifier model that you could access either via a REST API (with an SDK available for Xamarin apps), or by downloading a model that can be run on your device using either CoreML, TensorFlow or WindowsML (we looked at using TensorFlow in an Android app in an earlier blog post).