.NET Parallel Programming

All about Async/Await, System.Threading.Tasks, System.Collections.Concurrent, System.Linq, and more…

Are you using TPL Dataflow? We’d love to know!

Are you using the new System.Threading.Tasks.Dataflow.dll library, either from its CTPs or from the .NET 4.5 Developer Preview or Beta?  We'd love to hear about it, and if you have time, what your experiences have been (good or bad).  What kind of solution are you building, and how are you using TPL Dataflow in it?  Has the ...

Implementing a simple ForEachAsync, part 2

After my previous post, I received several emails and comments from folks asking why I chose to implement ForEachAsync the way I did.  My goal with that post wasn’t to prescribe a particular approach to iteration, but rather to answer a question I’d received… obviously, however, I didn’t provide enough background...

Implementing a simple ForEachAsync

Jon Skeet recently asked me how I might go about implementing the following “asynchronous ForEach” behavior: Given what we now know about SemaphoreSlim from my previous post, here’s one way to achieve this: public static Task ForEachAsync<TSource, TResult>(     this IEnumerable<TSource...

Building Async Coordination Primitives, Part 7: AsyncReaderWriterLock

In my last past, we looked at building an AsyncLock in terms of an AsyncSemaphore.  In this post, we’ll build a more advanced construct, an asynchronous reader/writer lock.An asynchronous reader/writer lock is more complicated than any of the previous coordination primitives we’ve created.  It also involves more policy, ...

Building Async Coordination Primitives, Part 6: AsyncLock

Last time, we looked at building an AsyncSemaphore.  Here, we’ll look at building support for an async mutual exclusion mechanism that supports scoping via ‘using’. As mentioned in the previous post, semaphores are great for throttling and resource management.  You can give a semaphore an initial count of the number of things to ...

Building Async Coordination Primitives, Part 5: AsyncSemaphore

In my last few posts, I covered building an AsyncManualResetEvent, an AsyncAutoResetEvent, an AsyncCountdownEvent, and an AsyncBarrier.  In this post, I’ll cover building an AsyncSemaphore class.Semaphores have a wide range of applicability.  They’re great for throttling, for protected access to a limited set of resources...

Building Async Coordination Primitives, Part 2: AsyncAutoResetEvent

In my last post, I discussed building an asynchronous version of a manual-reset event.  This time, we’ll build an asynchronous version of an auto-reset event.A manual-reset event is transitioned to the signaled state when requested to do so (i.e. calling Set()), and then it remains in that state until it’s manually ...