Andrew B Hall - MSFT

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.NET Core Debugging in VS Code

The C# extension for Visual Studio Code offers powerful editing and debugging support for .NET Core applications on Windows, Mac, and Linux, including: Getting started To get started you will need to do a few things (see our GitHub page for complete instructions) Working with Console apps If you are working with a console ...

Debug UWP Prelaunch with VS2015

On Windows 10, the startup performance of Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps is improved by proactively launching and then suspending apps in a technique called Prelaunch. Many applications will not need to do anything special to work in this mode, but some applications may need to adjust their behavior, for example an application...

Breakpoint Generator Extension

Posting on behalf of Jakob Ehn and Utkarsh Shigihalli, Visual Studio ALM Rangers and MVPs As developers, we are often confronted with existing, potentially large codebases that we have never seen before but are asked to make changes in. It can be a class library received from a colleague or a complete application downloaded from GitHub to ...

Debugging Optimized Code

In your normal edit->compile->debug workflow, you will generally use the Debug build configuration. Debug builds compile code to keep the executable machine code as close to the original source as possible to ensure an optimal debugging experience. This however can come at the expense of performance, both memory and speed. Conversely, ...

Debugging .NET Native Windows Universal Apps

With the release of Windows 10 we also shipped Visual Studio Tools for Windows 10. As you will have heard Universal Windows apps written in .NET (either C# or VB) will be compiled to native machine code before being deployed to customer devices using .NET Native. However, the default Debug configuration still uses .NET Core runtime to allow ...

.NET EnC support for Lambdas and other improvements in Visual Studio 2015

Hopefully you saw our previous post covering newly supported edit types added in our previous CTP of Visual Studio 2015 (if not, I’d recommend looking at that post first). Now, we are pleased to announce that Visual Studio 2015 RC contains even further Edit and Continue (Enc) improvements when debugging .NET applications. New Edit and ...

C++ EnC in Visual Studio 2015

One of the most useful features of the Visual Studio debugger is Edit and Continue (EnC), which works for both managed and native code (where native admittedly had some significant limitations in previous versions of Visual Studio through 2013). In this post I want to share some changes to EnC for C++ developers with Visual Studio RC, and also...

Make Debugging Faster with Visual Studio

Have you ever been frustrated by slow debugging in Visual Studio? While we work hard to bring you a fast debugging experience, there are a lot of complex knobs that can affect the performance of any given application. In this blog post I’ll walk you through some tips you can use to improve the performance of your debug sessions and ...

Performance Improvement When Debugging .NET Code With Visual Studio 2015

Nothing is more frustrating than trying to debug an application that runs significantly slower when you’re debugging it than it does when it runs without a debugger attached. Over the years we’ve received numerous complaints along the lines of “when I run my application without the debugger it takes a few seconds to execute a...

EnC Improvements for .NET Debugging in Visual Studio 2015

You may recall that we previously asked you how important Edit and Continue is to your workflow and what current limitations are most painful. While removing these limitations is an ongoing process we’re pleased to announce that a number of previously unsupported edits are now supported in Visual Studio 2015 CTP 6. These include...