Visual Studio 2022 17.2 is now available!

Tim Heuer

Today we are pleased to release Visual Studio 2022 17.2 as generally available. We want to acknowledge and thank all developers like you that continue to provide us valuable feedback on your experiences using Visual Studio 2022 for helping shape the product and be a part of our release!

This release brings continued improvements to the C# and .NET experiences, new Git performance and experiences, updates for C++ developers, and new Azure tools for local development and deployment. We also continue to address your direct feedback submitted via Developer Community, addressing over 400 feedback items in this release! You can see the broader list of community feedback addressed in releases by visiting the fixes page on Developer Community.

I want to highlight a few of the new capabilities that are now available in Visual Studio 2022 17.2 released today. We have also released 17.3 Preview 1 – some additional details about that at the end of this post.

We now surface embedded source and Source Link as part of ‘Go to Implementation’ if a referenced assembly has provided this information. This allows you to navigate to the original source files that implements the target symbol. As seen below in this animation it’s as simple as placing your cursor on a symbol and press CTRL + F12 to navigate to the original source file.

Animation demonstrating using Go To Definition with embedded source and Source Link information

 

 

Raw string literal

In C# 11 we added a new language feature called raw string literals. We now have a refactoring to convert a normal or verbatim string literal to a raw string literal. To use raw string literals, set the language version in your project file to preview (using <LangVersion>preview</LangVersion>). Place your cursor on a normal or verbatim string, then press CTRL + ‘.’ to trigger the Quick Actions and Refactorings menu and select ‘Convert to raw string.’

Screenshot of raw string literal code fix

Debugging collections

We recently highlighted this capability in a Visual Studio 17.2 Preview 2, but it bears repeating again. If you regularly debug your .NET code and want to inspect into large and maybe complex collections, we’ve introduced a new visualizer in the debugging experience for IEnumerable object types:

Animation showing the IEnumerable debug visualizer in action

 

This provides a much easier view into this type of data to rapidly see the information you seek and be able to navigate quickly. For more details into this capability, be sure to check out other examples in our preview blog post from April.

Razor editor

Since 17.1 we’ve been improving the reliability of the new Razor editing experience.  In 17.2 we’ve added support in the editor for:

  • Ability to collapse regions for easy readability and organization
  • The new Razor editor now supports snippet functionality in C# code!
  • We’ve heard you and the ‘wrap div’ shortcut is enabled, use Shift + Alt + W to execute

Web Live Preview for ASP.NET Framework

In the initial release of Visual Studio 2022 we introduced a new capability for those working with Web Forms applications and the designer.  Web Live Preview enables your running app to be the design surface and provides code synchronization across source and web surface to help you navigate directly to the code file for the element you are editing.

Animation showing Web Live Preview in action with code sync

After continued studies of developers with Web Forms apps, we have improved the experiences even more in this release. We have also worked with several ASP.NET control vendors to ensure their support in this new designer. If you are working in Web Forms, please switch to this feature using Tools > Options > Web Forms Designer options menu and continue to give us feedback!

Azure Development

Azure continues to expand, and Visual Studio is right there for you to enable you to quickly be able to configure, debug, and deploy your services.

In Visual Studio 2022, we’ve expanded our capabilities in Connected Services to allow you to use containers for some Azure services that you might have configured, providing you with a local debug experience. This support has expanded to allow you to configure areas like Redis Cache, MongoDB, RabbitMQ, Storage, SQL, and Cosmos DB all using container images. Configure the dependency and F5 and we’ll launch the containers for you!

Screenshot of Azure services container configuration

In addition, we have support for the newest Azure container service, Azure Container Apps, within Visual Studio to deploy directly or configure with GitHub Actions. If you are deploying your ASP.NET Core web app or API using containers you can now choose Azure Container Apps as a deployment target in the Publish capabilities:

Screenshot of Publish configuration to Azure Container Apps

And we will help you either provision or select the right container environment, registry and other deployment options, including generating a GitHub Actions Workflow for deploying using CI/CD:

Screenshot of GitHub Workflow configuration option

This option will help you remove some of the initial complexities of setting up CI/CD by ensuring your repo has the right secrets for deployment, including helping to generate the right Azure Service Principals and publish profiles. If you are using GitHub repositories, please give this option a try!

C++

C++20 modules support is coming to CMake in Visual Studio! You can try out our experimental support now by ensuring you are supplying the /std:c++20 or /std:c++latest switches to the compiler and using the MSBuild (Visual Studio) generator for CMake rather than Ninja.

Other new features include inline hints, which give you indicators in the editor for the names of function parameters and deduced types. You can toggle this by pressing ctrl twice, or Alt + F1.

Screenshot of inline hints in C++ code

In Visual Studio 17.1 we introduced peripheral register and RTOS views for embedded developers. We are continuing to improve the capabilities of those views with usability improvements in 17.2:

  • The RTOS tool window is now hidden by default, this prevents showing a tool window with error messages that are not relevant when an RTOS is not being used.
  • When a user double clicks on an RTOS object in the tool window it adds a watch for the object.
  • When a user selects the stack pointer start/end values in the RTOS tool window it is opened in the memory window.
  • Thread awareness has been added for device targets for the call stack window.

Git tooling

We continue to work on enhancing the Git experience in Visual Studio. Line-staging support was introduced in Visual Studio 17.2 Preview and now you can also enable it in 17.2 GA by going to the preview features pane and toggling the “Enable line-staging support” checkbox.

Screenshot of Git line staging

The following list summarizes the main line-staging items we were able to address during this release:

During this release, we integrated a Git feature called the commit graph which leads to improving the performance of your Git operations and significantly improving performance in Visual Studio. We’ve observed an average of 70% performance improvement in loading branch history in the Git repository window for a repository with 332k commits when enabling the commit graph in Visual Studio.

Animation of performance improvements comparing old and new in Git tooling

We have also enhanced the detached HEAD experience by providing the option to keep or discard commits when switching to a branch and enhanced the branch checkout experience, a.k.a branch switching by adding in more options and context for when there are un-committed changes.

Screenshot of detached git commits

Enterprise Support

Version 17.2 is the second long term servicing channel (LTSC) for Visual Studio 2022.  Servicing channels provide large organizations increased flexibility over when they choose to adopt the new features that are released with minor version updates to the Enterprise, Professional, and Build Tools editions. The 17.2 LTSC release will be supported for 18 months, through January 9, 2024.

Upgrade your development experience today!

On behalf of the Visual Studio entire team, we’re grateful for your continued feedback and ideas you have to help provide you with the absolute best development tools for you. We’ve packed a bunch of updates small and large into Visual Studio 17.2 and encourage you to update your development environment today and experience all these features noted here, but also a bunch of great performance improvements across all the workloads.

What’s next – Visual Studio 2022 17.3

Today we’re also releasing the first preview of the next release, Visual Studio 2022 17.3 Preview 1. This is the main preview build that provides the tooling support for .NET MAUI development using Visual Studio.

Screenshot of .NET MAUI workload selection in setup

The .NET MAUI team is excited to bring this unified platform experience of development to Visual Studio 2022 and thanks to all of you that have provided feedback as you’ve come along for the .NET MAUI journey with us and endured the initial setup scripts, workload updates, etc. If you are developing for .NET MAUI, Visual Studio 2022 17.3 Preview 1 is the tool that you want to get today as well.

To give the latest preview a try, look at the Visual Studio 2022 Preview channel page for more information. Note that you’ll be able to install it side-by-side with the 17.2 GA release. .NET MAUI isn’t the only improvements we are making in the next version as we continue to add capabilities for .NET and C++ developers in this release. For full details on the 17.3 Preview 1 release, refer to the release notes.

Share your feedback and help us build a better Visual Studio!

As you use Visual Studio, let us know what you love, what you like, and where you’d like us to improve. You can share feedback with us via Developer Community: report any bugs or issues via report a problem and share your suggestions for new features or improvements to existing ones.

As always, we appreciate the time you’ve spent reporting issues and hope you continue to give us feedback on how we’re doing and what we can improve.

122 comments

Leave a comment

  • Josiah Bills

    Inline type hints are pretty useful, but I find myself activating and deactivating them by accident all the time simply because I use ctrl so often while programming. I can’t find a way to change this shortcut, so that would be pretty nice to have at some point.

    • Phil DeetsMicrosoft employee

      +1

      I ended up disabling the feature because I kept activating it by accident with the double-tab control shortcut. I wish there was a way to turn off control double-tapping but keep Alt+F1.

      (Edit since I noticed I have a Microsoft logo next to my name: I should clarify that while I am a Microsoft employee, I don’t work in the group that develops Visual Studio.)

  • MgSam

    I’m confused about why you guys are investing in Web Forms tooling. Isn’t Web Forms deprecated? It has no upgrade path to .NET (Core) from .NET Framework. Are you going to add a Silverlight designer too?

    Don’t get me wrong, I would love for such an upgrade path to exist- as I have old web apps in Web Forms that I have no interest in totally rewriting just to get them on modern cross-platform .NET. WYSIWYG is a lost art in modern frameworks.

    If your telemetry shows there are a lot of Web Forms apps out there still in development, then please talk to the .NET team and get an official migration path. It’s crazy the VS team is investing in Web Forms while the .NET team officially abandoned it years ago.

    • Sayed-Ibrahim-HashimiMicrosoft employee

      Hello MgSam, thanks for the comment.

      I’m confused about why you guys are investing in Web Forms tooling. Isn’t Web Forms deprecated?

      Web Forms is NOT deprecated, the framework support is limited to critical updates, but all ASP.NET full .NET Framework projects are fully supported. While we are not investing in the Web Forms framework, we still need to ensure that Web Forms developers can successfully develop their apps in Visual Studio.

      Are you going to add a Silverlight designer too?

      In contrast to Web Forms, Silverlight is obsolete so there are no investments happening there and support to develop in Visual Studio was removed years ago.

      If your telemetry shows there are a lot of Web Forms apps out there still in development, then please talk to the .NET team and get an official migration path

      Yes, there are LOTS of users still developing Web Forms projects in Visual Studio. Let me explain more why we are working on a new designer (“Web Live Preview”). In Visual Studio we have important accessibility requirements that we need to meet. The existing Web Forms designer is not accessible, and the code is written in a way that it’s almost impossible to make it accessible. It’s also not up-to-date with the latest web technology. We are creating a new designer to fix those issues. Another goal with the new designer is to one day enable a similar experience for ASP.NET Core projects (no commitments there, yet).

      Please talk to the .NET team and get an official migration path

      Migrating an ASP.NET full framework app to an ASP.NET Core app is very difficult, and not likely to be able to be automated in a way that will work for most users. What we are doing is working on an experiment to enable ASP.NET full framework developers to supplement the full framework app with an ASP.NET Core app. That way users can develop new pages in the ASP.NET Core project and maintain their existing full framework app. The idea is that hopefully over time more-and-more of the code base gets ported to the ASP.NET Core app. We will have more to share in this area soon. If we could create a magic wand to port an ASP.NET full framework app to ASP.NET Core we absolutely would do that, but from our investigations it doesn’t seem feasible.

      Another thing that we are doing with Web Live Preview is integrating the Edge Developer Tools into Visual Studio. We have an extension at https://aka.ms/edgetools-for-vs. We are hoping to get this built into Visual Studio in an upcoming release. I say this so that you know that the investment we are making in Web Live Preview is not strictly limited to ASP.NET full framework apps, there is value coming soon for ASP.NET Core users as well.

      Thanks for your comment, I really appreciate it. Please let me know if you have any more questions.

      • Jens Samson

        Yes, there are LOTS of users still developing Web Forms projects in Visual Studio. Let me explain more why we are working on a new designer (“Web Live Preview”). In Visual Studio we have important accessibility requirements that we need to meet. The existing Web Forms designer is not accessible, and the code is written in a way that it’s almost impossible to make it accessible. It’s also not up-to-date with the latest web technology. We are creating a new designer to fix those issues. Another goal with the new designer is to one day enable a similar experience for ASP.NET Core projects (no commitments there, yet).

        If you guys know that then why don’t you support it on .Net Core/5/6/Whatever it is called now ?
        The same for Linq-to-SQL. No migration path, no support on .Net Core/5/6/Whatever it is called now.
        For VB.Net it is even worse because there the situation is very very very unclear. The last post on the VB.Net blog dates from March 11, 2020 and was titled Visual Basic support planned for .NET 5.0. That is more than 2 year ago. Sometimes I wonder if you guys really want customers, you seem to be very good in not listening to them.

      • Wally McClure

        will we get more info at the upcoming build? If this is something that will be available as an alpha soon, I can provide some feedback on it probably starting this summer. I have a major customer and we’re trying to figure out how to migrate a couple of large webforms apps.

      • Matthew Hughes

        Migrating an ASP.NET full framework app to an ASP.NET Core app is very difficult, and not likely to be able to be automated in a way that will work for most users. What we are doing is working on an experiment to enable ASP.NET full framework developers to supplement the full framework app with an ASP.NET Core app. That way users can develop new pages in the ASP.NET Core project and maintain their existing full framework app. The idea is that hopefully over time more-and-more of the code base gets ported to the ASP.NET Core app. We will have more to share in this area soon. If we could create a magic wand to port an ASP.NET full framework app to ASP.NET Core we absolutely would do that, but from our investigations it doesn’t seem feasible.

        Woah this is huge news if it eventuates. We’ve been looking for a path forward with DotVVM, is there someone official we can follow to find out more?

  • John Barrett

    I’m seeing problems with the installer today.

    upon running the installer is just hangs (> 1hr) with the ‘wheel of death’ checking for updates. Tried different machines – same.

    So the effect is we cannot update Visual Studio 2022 Enterprise or Ent Preview

    screen shot

    • Roberto Mencia Franco

      The Visual Studio Installer gets stuck Checking for Updates. The only way is to go to Windows Apps & Features, uninstall VS from there and Install it fresh.
      It must be one more bug that they forgot to fix in this release.

          • Mike Diack

            Me too – just stuck at “Checking for updates” as soon as I start the installer.

        • Artem Kliatchkine

          Same issue like everyone else.
          When trying to update installer forever waits on “Checking for updates”
          After I (stupidly, I admit) run installer cleanup, it deleted the current VS installation and the attempt to install it again freezes on “Downloading installer” (0%, no activity).

          • Shayne van Asperen

            I’ve also done the same thing. Uninstallted VS to try to fix it and now I’m stuck trying to install it again. Can’t do any work now!

          • John Even Pedersen

            Almost exactly the same here.
            Deleted the installer-folder, and running the bootstrapper to install the installer again, but stuck at 0 B/sec

            Fortunantely I didn’t delete my current VS, so I can get back to work.
            Trying again in a few hours or tomorrow…

          • Martin Moe

            Same. Looks like this have the situation for at least a day and a half now. Some feedback from MS on this problem please?

            For me it’s not only the upgrade that is a problem. I needed a feature and I can’t get it. So I’m stuck on the thing I was planning to do.

        • Peter Widmer

          I have the same issue – any news on this? Can’t work either.
          @msft: have there been changes on how proxy connection is done?

  • Roberto Mencia Franco

    Are there any plans to stop adding new functionality in VS and actually fix all the stuff that doesn’t work at the moment?
    I believe that fixing all the bugs would be the biggest feature of all, and also the one that would increase productivity the most. When we don’t need to restart VS 2-3 times a day and manually delete .vs folder multiple times a week, we would save 100s of hours a year. That is even better than getting a new laptop replacement.

    Maybe a big push from the whole VS team to go all in bootcamp for 2 months to see who can fix the most amount of bugs. You probably have 10k+ bugs to choose from in VS2022, so it should be easy to get a bunch of them done.

      • Roberto Mencia Franco

        They now use a new technique to fix bugs.

        When you report a bug, they reply 2 months later saying that they can’t reproduce the problem in a new project.
        Then they ask you to do their test job and reproduce it for them and give them the steps and a solution.
        If you fail to do so in 14 days, they close the bug saying that it didn’t get enough support. And then they hope to go away by itself.
        Or they also ask you to test it in the latest preview.

        It’s getting worse by the day.

        I report bugs at a rate of 6-8 week. The list of the bugs I created takes me to do “load more” 8 to 10 times. And is only for VS2022.

        • Mike Diack

          Agreed. I’ve raised this over and over with VS project/programme management – it’s not the bug reporting tools that are rubbish – it’s the staff and process that are crap.

        • Tim HeuerMicrosoft employee

          @Roberto – Please feel free to send me a link/list of your reports and I’m interested in taking a closer look. 6-8/week seems like you’re definitely experiencing some frustration, so I’d love to learn more about the scenario/platform/app types/etc. that I assume you’ve already provided in the bug reports.

          • Mike Diack

            This is getting tiring. I’ve emailed John Montgomery, Nick Uhlenhuth and Mads K. giving case by case examples of just how poor the support process is and the staffs responses and specific bugs that have been really shoddily handled. Why should people bother, when you pay lip service to feedback.

            As others have said – the support staff always seem to ask that you go to the nth degree to reproduce problems for them, even when they can be seen sometimes via a simple hello world level app, compiling with default or standard settings.

            Another thing – which I’ve emailed, mentioned, left feedback about to countless people.
            It is NO GOOD AT ALL for the response bot to feedback by saying:

            Feedback Bot
            ···
            A fix for this issue is now available in preview release. Try out the fix by installing the most recent preview from https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs/preview/
            —-

            I’ve mentioned this till I’m blue in the face. WHY OH WHY OH WHY OH WHY, doesn’t the response tell you EXACTLY which version the fix is in (e.g. 17.1 Preview 3)! The latest/current version of the preview release is not fixed at any moment in time. Surely as developers, your staff must know the importance of exactness in bug reporting and responses. WHY NOT DO IT – I’ve been asking for this for at least 3-4 years now, and yet I imagine it would be easy to implement.

            Talk to Nick, John, Mads. People are furious – not with the technical bug reporting tools, but the Microsoft staff and process – which is anything but transparent.

          • Roberto Mencia Franco

            The main issue with the testing is the lack of Testing experience.

            Most of the issues come with large solutions, 20 projects in multiple technologies, a number of refactorings and git merges pull, pushes and branch merges. Also, Solutions that go from version to version of VS and upgrades of nuget packages. Upgrades may corrupt .vs folder and other things. Many issues temporarily go away after restarting VS or deleting .vs folder. We are under stress to deliver on our jobs and we pay for the licenses of VS, we don’t have the time to do the testing of VS as well.

            The tester can’t expect to always reproduce a bug by creating a brand new project, adding 2 lines of code and say “it works in my machine”. Additionally, we can’t really provide MS with our solutions or spend hours creating a simple solution to send it for the tester to get their job done.

            VS should improve the telemetry. Also, the button to report an issue should be able to upload a VS dump. I can’t go back in time one week later to reproduce the bug and create a bug, the code may not be there. However, when the bug happens I don’t mind reporting the issue and upload the required dump if it’s collected automatically and sent to MS.

            The biggest improvement in developer productivity is not AI in the Intellisense, it is when VS doesn’t fail, when we don’t need to restart VS, and delete .vs many times a day.

            I think that if you manage to get all the Developers in VS to stop for 1-2 months and really focus on a rock solid VS next release, people would be happier with a VS version that doesn’t fail than announcing a few new features, even if they may be interesting when the basics don’t work all the time.

            It doesn’t make sense to me that I have to raise 5 or 6 issues every week that I work with VS.
            Please, focus on fixing issues and improving the VS telemetry to capture the required information that you will need to investigate the problem automatically. Also, create a few large solutions with a number of dependencies, technologies and nuget packages to use during testing. Continue upgrading those large solutions to the latest versions to surface upgrading issues.

          • Roberto Mencia Franco

            How could I get in contact to send you that information?

        • Andrew Buchanan

          It’s all gone so wrong in vs 2022. I’d rather see all new features stopped and bugs fixed as well. The razor/blazor situation has been terrible and ongoing.

    • Luca Beretta

      Totally agree!

      I’ve reported dozens of bugs, some seemingly trivial, and I’m still waiting for them to close at least one.

      A lot of new features of dubious usefulness, while every 2 hours of work we have to close and reopen visual studio because it eat up 4 Gb of RAM and more, and slows down until it becomes unusable.

      Finally I stopped to report bugs, so I can save at least that time.

    • Премьер Взлет

      Totally agree !!!
      VS2022 is becoming more and more like a product from early 90s. To use it, you have to jump around with a shaman’s tambourine.

    • Andrey Shevchenko

      @”Are there any plans to stop adding new functionality in VS and actually fix all the stuff that doesn’t work at the moment?”

      I have exactly the same question. The amount of bugs in VS is ridiculous and nobody cares, but the new stuff that really nobody wanted keep coming out.

  • Ferdinando Cavaliere

    “The new Razor editor now supports snippet functionality!”

    WHERE ARE?????????

    Before, I typed h1 or div or something else, I hit tab and it didn’t drop anything. Now … the same thing

  • Izhar Azati

    You continue to make efforts to make us abandon your tools!
    We pay a lot of money for a product that is shredded to a version with more and more BUGS and remove support for basic tools like SSIS SSRS
    Send us to JAVA and the “COMMAND LINE” programs like 40 years ago.
    Not everyone wants clouds either.