Microsoft C++ Team At CppCon 2019: Videos Available

Sy Brand

Sy

Last month a large contingent from the Microsoft C++ team attended CppCon. We gave fourteen presentations covering our tools, developments in the standard, concepts which underlie the work we do, and more.

We also recorded an episode of CppCast with Microsoft MVPs Rob Irving and Jason Turner. You can hear more about the Open Sourcing of MSVC’s STL, the upcoming ASAN support in Visual Studio and our team’s effort in achieving C++17 standards conformance.

All our CppCon videos are available now, so please give them a watch and let us know what you think!

If you have any subjects you’d like us to consider talking about at CppCon 2020 or other conferences, please let us know. We can be reached via the comments below, email (visualcpp@microsoft.com), and Twitter (@VisualC).

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4 comments

  • Avatar
    Gautham B A

    Really excited to see that Microsoft is putting efforts to make C++ development easier on Windows. However, I feel that the development experience is still not on par with that of C#. In particular, I’m referring to providing the kind of intellisense that C# has, to C++.

    • Avatar
      Me Gusta

      This is something that is likely only going to change if we get to the point that we only use modues.
      It is easy to forget, or be ignorant of the fact, that C# uses metadata to give information on what is in an assembly. However to get intellisense information, the C++ intellisense engine must compile the files. What’s worse, headers can’t be viewed in isolation. Suppose we have:
      #include <Windows.h>
      #include <cstdio>
      in one source file and:
      #include <cstdio>
      in another source file. The C++ intellisense engine couldn’t use the compiled output of the headers in the first source file for the second one because the Windows.h header file could change the context of cstdio and thus parse differently. There are other things that make C++ intellisense a much harder problem that .NET languages.
      If the intellisense problem was so easy to solve, we wouldn’t have the issue of inaccurate or slow intellisense that occurs in all C++ intellisense systems, this includes other IDEs.

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