.NET Blog

Free. Cross-platform. Open source. A developer platform for building all your apps.

Web Application Projects is released
Web Application Projects is released
Web Application Projects 1.0 is live! New since RC1:   Web Application Projects now provided a similar development style and compilation model as was used in Visual Studio 2003, but with full ASP.NET 2.0 support. For more information checkout: http://msdn.microsoft.com/asp.net/reference/infrastructure/wap/default....
Improve Source View Performance
Improve Source View Performance
In case you have observed any slowness in your source view around typing or arrowing through code, here are a few tips that may help. 1. Turn off background HTML validation.  Go to Tools / Options and select Text Editor / HTML / Validation in the tree view on the left side.  Uncheck the Show Errors check box.< ?xml:namespace prefix = o ...
Have you installed the new spell checker add-in yet?
Have you installed the new spell checker add-in yet?
Mikhail Arkhipov on our team recently developed a spell checker add-in to Visual Studio 2005 that allows you to spell check the contents of your ASP.NET or HTML page in HTML view.  You need to have Office 2003 installed on your machine in order for this feature to work.  See http://blogs.msdn.com/mikhailarkhipov/archive/2006/04/17/...
Meet the Team – Danny Chen
Meet the Team – Danny Chen
Hi, I'm Danny Chen, (2nd from the right, grey shirt, next to Pete).  Like Pete, I'm also an SDET for Visual Web Developer.  I've been at Microsoft for about 1 1/2 years.  Prior to shipping Visual Studio 2005, I was on the QA team for ASP.NET.  I really enjoy working with the extensibility features of Visual Studio and ASP.NET whether it's...
Welcome to our blog!
Welcome to our blog!
Welcome to the Web Development Tools team blog!  Recently we decided to create a team blog to ensure regular content to you from more of our team members. Who are we, you ask?  Web Development Tools is the team that brought you the awesome Visual Web Developer Express product.  If you haven't downloaded this yet, what are ...
Large Object Heap
Large Object Heap
LOH (Large Object Heap) contains objects that are 85,000 bytes or bigger (there’s also some objects that are less than 85,000 bytes that are allocated on the LOH by the runtime itself but usually they are very small and we’ll ignore them for this discussion).   The way LOH is implemented changed dramatically from 1.0 to 1.1. In 1.0 ...
Comments are closed.0.NET
Workstation GC for server applications?
Workstation GC for server applications?
In Using GC Efficiently – Part 2 I talked about different flavors of GC that exist in the CLR and how you choose which flavor is good for your applications, and I said that the Server GC flavor is designed for server applications. As with any performance tuning there are always exceptions – there’s no one-rule-fits-all. Recently I worked...
Comments are closed.0.NET
Thank you all for your comments!
Thank you all for your comments!
I will write about the things you asked in my last blog entry's comments in the next few blog entries...
Comments are closed.0.NET
What do you want to know?
What do you want to know?
In my previous Using GC Efficiently entries I've basically covered all the big areas of GC in the CLR. There are of course a lot of things to write about GC but I want to keep GC users as my target audience, not GC designers/implementors. So I would really like to hear from you - our customers of the .NET Framework - if you have ...
Comments are closed.0.NET
So, what’s new in the CLR 2.0 GC?
So, what’s new in the CLR 2.0 GC?
Certainly that’s one of the most frequently asked questions I get (at the PDC too!). So since PDC already happened I can tell the rest of you about the new stuff happened in GC in CLR 2.0. The slides can be downloaded here. And I will be referring to some of the slides. I must apologize for your having to click on the link to see the slide ...
Comments are closed.0.NET