Immo Landwerth

Program Manager, .NET

Immo Landwerth is a program manager on the .NET Framework team at Microsoft. He specializes in API design, the base class libraries (BCL), and .NET Standard. He works on base class libraries which represents the core types of the .NET platform, such as string and int but also includes collections and IO. He's involved with portable class libraries and works on shipping more framework components in an out-of-band fashion via NuGet.

Post by this author

Would you like a MultiDictionary?

We’ve recently shipped new collection types on NuGet with our Immutable Collections package. NuGet allows us to ship prerelease and experimental versions of libraries to gather feedback from the community. In this post, our software developer intern Ian Hays will talk about his intern project: an experimental NuGet package containing ...
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.NET

Update to SIMD Support

A month ago we announced support for SIMD. Today, we're announcing an update to "RyuJIT" and our NuGet package that exposes the SIMD programming model. Updates to the Microsoft.Bcl.Simd NuGet package More types for Vector<T> We've expanded the support of the Vector<T> types: Support for mutable vector types We've also changed ...
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.NET

.NET at MonkeySpace Europe, June 9-11

This post was written by Daniel Plaisted, a member of the .NET Framework team who will be at MonkeySpace. MonkeySpace is the “official cross platform and open-source .NET conference.” This year, MonkeySpace Europe will be held June 9th-11th in Dublin, Ireland. Since it’s a conference specifically focused on open source and ...
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.NET

.NET at MonkeySpace Europe, June 9-11

This post was written by Daniel Plaisted, a member of the .NET Framework team who will be at MonkeySpace. MonkeySpace is the “official cross platform and open-source .NET conference.” This year, MonkeySpace Europe will be held June 9th-11th in Dublin, Ireland. Since it’s a conference specifically focused on open source and ...
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.NET

Get your libraries ready for Windows Phone 8.1

Two weeks ago, we released the Windows Phone preview for developers. In this post, I’ll cover what this means for library and app developers. What this means for library developers As a .NET developer you can target Windows Phone 8.1 via two platforms: Apps that target Windows Phone Silverlight 8.1 can consume existing libraries and...
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.NET

Sharing code across platforms

At Build we announced two great ways to re-use your code: the new Universal Windows apps, and the improved portable class libraries. They both help you reuse code across platforms. In this post, I’ll describe both options and how you can choose between them. Overview Why two options? The short answer is that shared projects are about ...
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.NET

Debugging support for .NET Native Preview apps

Our friends in Visual Studio have written a post about the debugging support for the .NET Native Preview. Go check it out...

How your feedback is shaping .NET

Eight months ago we asked you to provide feedbackon the features you want us to ship. And you didn’t disappoint! Since then, we’ve seen hundreds of Tweets, blog posts and user voice votes. It’s great to be part of such a thriving community. We are fully committed to improving the .NET ecosystem by being more open. To quote Habib from ...
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.NET

The JIT finally proposed. JIT and SIMD are getting married.

Processor speed no longer follows Moore’s law. So in order to optimize the performance of your applications, it’s increasingly important to embrace parallelization. Or, as Herb Sutter phrased it, the free lunch is over. You may think that task-based programming or offloading work to threads is already the answer. While multi-...
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.NET

A new look for .NET Reference Source

This post was written by Alok Shriram, Program Manager on the .NET Framework team. He will show you a significantly improved experience around .NET Reference Source. Today I'm very excited to announce that we have an awesome new experience to use the .NET Framework reference source. Browsing .NET Reference Source First of all, most people ...

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