.NET Blog

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.NET Framework October 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the October 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup and Cumulative Updates for .NET Framework.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.
ASP.NET

Addresses an issue with ValidationContext.MemberName when using custom DataAnnotation.ValidationAttribute.

CLR1

Reduces the risk of returning unordered ConstructorInfo’s from Type.GetConstructors().

Announcing .NET Core 3.1 Preview 1

Today, we’re announcing .NET Core 3.1 Preview 1. .NET Core 3.1 will be a small release focused on key improvements in Blazor and Windows desktop, the two big additions in .NET Core 3.0. It will be a long term support (LTS) release with an expected final ship date of December 2019.

.NET Framework October 2019 Security and Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the October 2019 Security and Quality Rollup and Cumulative Updates for .NET Framework.
Security
No new security fixes. See September 2019 Security and Quality Rollup for the latest security updates.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.

Introducing .NET Core Windows Forms Designer Preview 1

Introducing .NET Core Windows Forms Designer Preview 1
We just released a GA version of .NET Core 3.0 that includes support for Windows Forms and WPF. And along with that release we’re happy to announce the first preview version of the Windows Forms Designer for .NET Core projects!

.NET Framework September 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup

We have released the September 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup and Cumulative Updates for .NET Framework for Windows 10
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.
BCL1

Addresses an issue that affects thread contention that occurs in BinaryFormatter.GetTypeInformation by using ConcurrentDictionary to handle multi-thread access.

Joining the .NET Foundation Maturity Model Pilot

Joining the .NET Foundation Maturity Model Pilot
The .NET Foundation is starting a new pilot program to increase quality and user confidence in open source projects, using a new project maturity model. We’ve been working with the Technical Review Action Group at the Foundation to help shape the program.

Announcing F# 4.7

We’re excited to announce general availability of F# 4.7 in conjunction with the .NET Core 3.0 release! In this post, I’ll show you how to get started, explain everything in F# 4.7 and give you a sneak peek at what we’re doing for the next version of F#.

Announcing .NET Core 3.0

Announcing .NET Core 3.0
We’re excited to announce the release of .NET Core 3.0. It includes many improvements, including adding Windows Forms and WPF, adding new JSON APIs, support for ARM64 and improving performance across the board. C# 8 is also part of this release,

AI Machine Learning

ML.NET and Model Builder at .NET Conf 2019 (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited today to announce updates to Model Builder and improvements in ML.NET. You can learn more in the “What’s new in ML.NET?.” session at .NET Conf.
ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) for .NET developers.

Hey .NET! Have you tried ML.NET?

ML.NET is an open source and cross-platform machine learning framework made for .NET developers.
Using ML.NET you can easily build custom machine learning models for scenarios like sentiment analysis, price prediction, sales forecasting, recommendation, image classification, and more.
ML.NET 1.0 was released at //Build 2019,

Announcing ML.NET 1.2 and Model Builder updates (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited to announce ML.NET 1.2 and updates to Model Builder and the CLI. ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework for .NET developers. ML.NET also includes Model Builder (a simple UI tool for Visual Studio) and the ML.NET CLI (Command-line interface) to make it super easy to build custom Machine Learning (ML) models using Automated Machine Learning (AutoML).

Submit to the Applied F# Challenge!

This post was written by Lena Hall, a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate at Microsoft.
F# Software Foundation has recently announced their new initiative — Applied F# Challenge! We encourage you to participate and send your submissions about F# on Azure through the participation form.

Tell us your thoughts on ML.NET, an open source and cross-platform machine learning framework

ML.NET is an open source and cross-platform machine learning framework made for .NET developers. .NET developers can use their C# or F# skills to easily integrate custom machine learning into their web, mobile, desktop, gaming, or IoT applications without any prior expertise in developing or tuning machine learning models.

Announcing ML.NET 0.8 – Machine Learning for .NET

ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) which makes machine learning accessible for .NET developers.
ML.NET allows you to create and use machine learning models targeting scenarios to achieve common tasks such as sentiment analysis, issue classification, forecasting,

Announcing ML.NET 0.7 (Machine Learning .NET)

We’re excited to announce today the release of ML.NET 0.7 – the latest release of the cross-platform and open source machine learning framework for .NET developers (ML.NET 0.1 was released at //Build 2018). This release focuses on enabling better support for recommendation based ML tasks,

Using .NET Hardware Intrinsics API to accelerate machine learning scenarios

This week’s blog post is by Brian Lui, one of our summer interns on the .NET team, who’s been hard at work. Over to Brian:
Hello everyone! This summer I interned in the .NET team, working on ML.NET, an open-source machine learning platform which enables .NET developers to build and use machine learning models in their .NET applications.

Announcing ML.NET 0.6 (Machine Learning .NET)

Today we’re announcing our latest monthly release: ML.NET 0.6! ML.NET is a cross-platform, open source machine learning framework for .NET developers. We want to enable every .NET developer to train and use machine learning models in their applications and services. If you haven’t tried ML.NET yet,

Introducing Tensor for multi-dimensional Machine Learning and AI data

Overview
Tensor is an exchange type for homogenous multi-dimensional data for 1 to N dimensions. The motivation behind introducing Tensor<T> is to make it easy for Machine Learning library vendors like CNTK, Tensorflow, Caffe, Scikit-Learn to port their libraries over to .NET with minimal dependencies in place. 

ASP.NET

.NET Core April 2019 Updates – 2.1.10 and 2.2.4

Today, we are releasing the .NET Core April 2019 Update. These updates contain security and reliability fixes. See the individual release notes for details on included fixes.

.NET Core 2.2.4 and .NET Core SDK 2.2.106 ( Download | Release Notes )
.NET Core 2.1.10 and .NET Core SDK 2.1.506 ( Download | Release Notes)

Security
Microsoft Security Advisory CVE-2019-0815: ASP.NET Core Denial of Service Vulnerability
A denial of service vulnerability exists in ASP.NET Core 2.2 where,

Collecting .NET Core Linux Container CPU Traces from a Sidecar Container

It is challenging to collect performance traces of ASP.NET Core applications running inside Linux containers. This blog post describes an approach that use a sidecar container to collect CPU trace of an ASP.NET application running in a Linux container.

Calling All Desktop Developers: How do you interact with data?

Connecting to databases and services is an important part of desktop application development for many of our customers. Visual Studio provides a variety of tools and technologies that can help you connect to and interact with your different data sources. We’d love your help in shaping our future offerings in this space!

Build a web service with F# and .NET Core 2.0

Earlier this year, I wrote about an update to the roadmap for F# and .NET Core. I had mentioned that there were a number of things you could build with F# and .NET Core today, such as web services. In this post,

Get Started with F# as a C# developer

Get Started with F# as a C# developer
One of our previous posts, Why You Should Use F#, listed a few reasons why F# is worth trying out today. In this post, we’ll cover some of the basics you need to know to be successful.

Azure

Automating Release Notes with Azure Functions

We can all agree that tracking the progress of a project enhances productivity and is an effective way to keep everyone involved of its progress. When it comes to managing your project in Azure DevOps (formerly VSTS) or GitHub, you have all of your artifacts in one place: code,

C#

Announcing ML.NET 1.4 Preview and Model Builder updates (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited to announce ML.NET 1.4 Preview and updates to Model Builder and CLI.
ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework for .NET developers. ML.NET also includes Model Builder (a simple UI tool) and CLI to make it super easy to build custom Machine Learning (ML) models using Automated Machine Learning (AutoML).

Create Interactive .NET Documentation with Try .NET

Try .NET is an interactive documentation generator for .NET Core. Using the dotnet try global tool you can now create interactive documentation too. This is an early preview of the dotnet try global tool so, please check our repository and NuGet package for regular updates.

Performance Improvements in .NET Core 3.0

Take a tour through some of the many improvements, big and small, that have gone into the .NET Core 3.0 runtime and core libraries to make apps and services leaner and faster.

Default implementations in interfaces

Default implementations in interfaces
With last week’s posts Announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 5 and Visual Studio 2019 version 16.1 Preview 3, the last major feature of C# 8.0 is now available in preview.
A big impediment to software evolution has been the fact that you couldn’t add new members to a public interface.

Announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 5

Today, we are announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 5. It includes a new Json serializer, support for publishing single file executables, an update to runtime roll-forward, and changes in the BCL. If you missed it, check out the improvements we released in .NET Core 3.0 Preview 4,

Visual Studio 2019 .NET productivity

Your friendly neighborhood .NET productivity team (aka. Roslyn) focuses a lot on improving the .NET coding experience. Sometimes it’s the little refactorings and code fixes that really improve your workflow. You may have seen many improvements in the previews, but for all of you who were eagerly awaiting the GA release here’s a few features you may enjoy!

An update to C# versions and C# tooling

Starting with Visual Studio 2019 Preview 4, we'll be adjusting how C# versions are treated in .NET tooling. Firstly, we're adding two new Language Version (LangVersion) values: LatestMajor and Preview. Rad the post to see how they stack up with the currently supported list of values.

Take C# 8.0 for a spin

Take C# 8.0 for a spin
Yesterday we announced the first preview of both Visual Studio 2019 (Making every developer more productive with Visual Studio 2019) and .NET Core 3.0 (Announcing .NET Core 3 Preview 1 and Open Sourcing Windows Desktop Frameworks).

Building C# 8.0

Building C# 8.0
The next major version of C# is C# 8.0. It’s been in the works for quite some time, even as we built and shipped the minor releases C# 7.1, 7.2 and 7.3, and I’m quite excited about the new capabilities it will bring.

Docker

Announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 5

Today, we are announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 5. It includes a new Json serializer, support for publishing single file executables, an update to runtime roll-forward, and changes in the BCL. If you missed it, check out the improvements we released in .NET Core 3.0 Preview 4,

Using .NET and Docker Together – DockerCon 2019 Update

DockerCon 2019 is being held this week, in San Francisco. We posted a DockerCon 2018 update last year, and it is time to share how we’ve improved the experience of using .NET and Docker together over the last year.
We have a group of .NET Core team members attending the conference again this year.

Entity Framework

Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.0 and Entity Framework 6.3 General Availability

We are extremely excited to announce the general availability of EF Core 3.0and EF 6.3 on nuget.org.
The final versions of .NET Core 3.0 and ASP.NET Core 3.0 are also available now.
How to get EF Core 3.0
EF Core 3.0 is distributed exclusively as a set of NuGet packages.

Release Candidate builds of Entity Framework Core 3.0 and Entity Framework 6.3 are now available

We previously said that preview 9 would be your last chance to test EF Core 3.0 and EF 6.3 before general availability. But it turns out that we made enough improvements to our libraries and across the whole of .NET Core 3.0 to justify publishing a release candidate build.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.0 Preview 9 and Entity Framework 6.3 Preview 9

Preview 9 your last chance to try Entity Framework Core 3.0 and Entity Framework 6.3 before we release the final versions later this month. Get a head start on everything that is new and please give us your feedback.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.0 Preview 8 and Entity Framework 6.3 Preview 8

The Preview 8 versions of the EF Core 3.0 package and the EF 6.3 package are now available for download from nuget.org.
New previews of .NET Core 3.0 and ASP.NET Core 3.0 are also available today.
Please install these previews to validate that all the functionality required by your applications is available and works correctly. 

Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.0 Preview 6 and Entity Framework 6.3 Preview 6

New previews of the next versions of EF Core and EF 6 are now available on NuGet.Org.
What is new in EF Core 3.0 Preview 6
In recent months, a lot of our efforts have been focused on a new LINQ implementation for EF Core 3.0.

Announcing Entity Framework 6.3 Preview with .NET Core Support

The first preview of the EF 6.3 runtime is now available in NuGet.
Note that the package is versioned as 6.3.0-preview5. We plan to continue releasing previews of EF 6.3 every month in alignment with the .NET Core 3.0 previews, until we ship the final version.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.0 Preview 4

Today, we are making the fourth preview of Entity Framework Core 3.0 available on NuGet, alongside .NET Core 3.0 Preview 4 and ASP.NET Core 3.0 Preview 4. We encourage you to install this preview to test the new functionality and assess the impact of the included breaking changes.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 2.2

Today we’re making the final version of EF Core 2.2 available, alongside ASP.NET Core 2.2 and .NET Core 2.2. This is the latest release of our open-source and cross-platform object-database mapping technology.
EF Core 2.2 RTM includes more than a hundred bug fixes and a few new features:
Spatial data support
Spatial data can be used to represent the physical location and shape of objects.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 2.2 Preview 3

Entity Framework Core 2.2 Preview 3 available with a new preview of our data provider for Cosmos DB and updated spatial extensions for various providers. Preview 3 is going to be the last milestone before EF Core 2.2 RTM, so now is your last chance to try the bits and give us feedback if you want to have an impact on the quality and the shape of the APIs in this release.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 2.2 Preview 2 and the preview of the Cosmos DB provider and spatial extensions for EF Core

Today we are making EF Core 2.2 Preview 2 available, together with a preview of our data provider for Cosmos DB and new spatial extensions for our SQL Server and in-memory providers.
Obtaining the preview
The preview bits are available on NuGet,

F#

The F# development home on GitHub is now dotnet/fsharp

TL;DR We’ve moved the F# GitHub repository from microsoft/visualfsharp to dotnet/fsharp, as specified in the corresponding RFC.

F# has a somewhat strange history in its name and brand. If we roll back the clocks to the year 2015, F# sort of had two identities.

Announcing F# 4.6

We’re excited to announce general availability of F# 4.6 and the F# tools for Visual Studio 2019! In this post, I’ll show you how to get started, explain the F# 4.6 feature set, give you an update on the F# tools for Visual Studio,

Submit to the Applied F# Challenge!

This post was written by Lena Hall, a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate at Microsoft.
F# Software Foundation has recently announced their new initiative — Applied F# Challenge! We encourage you to participate and send your submissions about F# on Azure through the participation form.

Announcing F# 4.6 Preview

F# 4.6 is now fully released. See the announcement blog post for more.
We’re excited to announce that Visual Studio 2019 will ship a new version of F# when it releases: F# 4.6!
F# 4.6 is a smaller update to the F# language,

Announcing F# 4.5

Today, we’re incredibly pleased to announce general availability of F# 4.5.
This post will walk through the changes in F# 4.5 (just like the preview post), then show some updates to F# tooling, and finally talk a bit about where what we’re thinking about for the next F# version.

Announcing F# 4.5 Preview

Accounting for this change on Windows build servers: You may be doing one of the following things to install F# on a Windows build server. Installing the full Visual Studio IDE Installing the F# Compiler SDK MSI Neither of these options have been recommended for some time, but are still available with F# 4.1. For using F# 4.5 in a Windows build server, we recommend (in order of preference), Using the .NET SDK, the FSharp.Compiler.Tools package, or the Visual Studio Build Tools SKU.
Better async stack traces Starting with F# 4.5 and FSharp.Core 4.5.0, stack traces for async computation expressions: Reported line numbers now correspond to the failing user code Non-user code is no longer emitted For example, consider the following DSL and its usage with an FSharp.Core version prior to 4.5.0: Note that both the f1 and f2 functions are called twice.

F# language and tools update for Visual Studio 2017 version 15.7

We’re excited to share updates about changes to F# and F# tools which shipped with the Visual Studio 2017 version 15.7 release. Let’s dive in!
Type Providers now support .NET Standard
For those who aren’t familiar with Type Providers, they are a feature of F# which allow you to get IntelliSense for data.

F# language and tools update for Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6

With the release of Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6, we’re excited to share updates to the F# language and core library, F# tooling in Visual Studio, and infrastructure updates that concern OSS contributors. Let’s dive in!
F# language and core library updates
Some foundational changes for the F# language and core library have been made,

Announcing F# support for .NET Core and .NET Standard projects in Visual Studio

We’re pleased to announce that Visual Studio 2017 15.5 Preview 4 now supports F# projects targeting .NET Core, .NET Standard, and .NET Framework through the .NET Core SDK. Some of you have noticed various levels of this support in the first,

Build a web service with F# and .NET Core 2.0

Earlier this year, I wrote about an update to the roadmap for F# and .NET Core. I had mentioned that there were a number of things you could build with F# and .NET Core today, such as web services. In this post,

GC

GC Perf Infrastructure – Part 0

In this blog entry and some future ones I will be showing off functionalities that our new GC perf infrastructure provides. Andy and I have been working on it (he did all the work; I merely played the consultant role). We will be open sourcing it soon and I wanted to give you some examples of using it and you can add these to your repertoire of perf analysis techniques when it’s available.

LOH

Large Object Heap Uncovered (an old MSDN article)

I wrote this article in 2008 and the MSDN website no longer has it so I am making it available here. Please note that it has been quite a while and some things related to LOH have changed quite a bit.

Machine Learning

ML.NET and Model Builder at .NET Conf 2019 (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited today to announce updates to Model Builder and improvements in ML.NET. You can learn more in the “What’s new in ML.NET?.” session at .NET Conf.
ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) for .NET developers.

Announcing ML.NET 1.4 Preview and Model Builder updates (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited to announce ML.NET 1.4 Preview and updates to Model Builder and CLI.
ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework for .NET developers. ML.NET also includes Model Builder (a simple UI tool) and CLI to make it super easy to build custom Machine Learning (ML) models using Automated Machine Learning (AutoML).

Hey .NET! Have you tried ML.NET?

ML.NET is an open source and cross-platform machine learning framework made for .NET developers.
Using ML.NET you can easily build custom machine learning models for scenarios like sentiment analysis, price prediction, sales forecasting, recommendation, image classification, and more.
ML.NET 1.0 was released at //Build 2019,

Announcing F# 4.6

We’re excited to announce general availability of F# 4.6 and the F# tools for Visual Studio 2019! In this post, I’ll show you how to get started, explain the F# 4.6 feature set, give you an update on the F# tools for Visual Studio,

Submit to the Applied F# Challenge!

This post was written by Lena Hall, a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate at Microsoft.
F# Software Foundation has recently announced their new initiative — Applied F# Challenge! We encourage you to participate and send your submissions about F# on Azure through the participation form.

Announcing ML.NET 0.9 – Machine Learning for .NET

 

Announcing ML.NET 0.9 – Machine Learning for .NET

ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) for .NET developers. Using ML.NET, developers can leverage their existing tools and skillsets to develop and infuse custom AI into their applications by creating custom machine learning models.

Announcing ML.NET 0.6 (Machine Learning .NET)

Today we’re announcing our latest monthly release: ML.NET 0.6! ML.NET is a cross-platform, open source machine learning framework for .NET developers. We want to enable every .NET developer to train and use machine learning models in their applications and services. If you haven’t tried ML.NET yet,

Why you should use F#

Why you should use F#
This post was written by Phillip Carter and Mads Torgersen. Both work on languages on the .NET team.
At Build 2017, we presented a tech talk entitled “Why You Should Use F#”. However, not everyone can attend Build,

Maoni

GC Perf Infrastructure – Part 0

In this blog entry and some future ones I will be showing off functionalities that our new GC perf infrastructure provides. Andy and I have been working on it (he did all the work; I merely played the consultant role). We will be open sourcing it soon and I wanted to give you some examples of using it and you can add these to your repertoire of perf analysis techniques when it’s available.

ML.NET

ML.NET and Model Builder at .NET Conf 2019 (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited today to announce updates to Model Builder and improvements in ML.NET. You can learn more in the “What’s new in ML.NET?.” session at .NET Conf.
ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) for .NET developers.

Announcing ML.NET 1.4 Preview and Model Builder updates (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited to announce ML.NET 1.4 Preview and updates to Model Builder and CLI.
ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework for .NET developers. ML.NET also includes Model Builder (a simple UI tool) and CLI to make it super easy to build custom Machine Learning (ML) models using Automated Machine Learning (AutoML).

Hey .NET! Have you tried ML.NET?

ML.NET is an open source and cross-platform machine learning framework made for .NET developers.
Using ML.NET you can easily build custom machine learning models for scenarios like sentiment analysis, price prediction, sales forecasting, recommendation, image classification, and more.
ML.NET 1.0 was released at //Build 2019,

Announcing ML.NET 1.2 and Model Builder updates (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited to announce ML.NET 1.2 and updates to Model Builder and the CLI. ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework for .NET developers. ML.NET also includes Model Builder (a simple UI tool for Visual Studio) and the ML.NET CLI (Command-line interface) to make it super easy to build custom Machine Learning (ML) models using Automated Machine Learning (AutoML).

Announcing ML.NET 1.1 and Model Builder updates (Machine Learning for .NET)

ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) for .NET developers.
ML.NET offers Model Builder Model Builder (a simple UI tool for Visual Studio) and CLI to make it super easy to build custom ML Models using AutoML.

Submit to the Applied F# Challenge!

This post was written by Lena Hall, a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate at Microsoft.
F# Software Foundation has recently announced their new initiative — Applied F# Challenge! We encourage you to participate and send your submissions about F# on Azure through the participation form.

Announcing ML.NET 0.9 – Machine Learning for .NET

 

Announcing ML.NET 0.9 – Machine Learning for .NET

ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) for .NET developers. Using ML.NET, developers can leverage their existing tools and skillsets to develop and infuse custom AI into their applications by creating custom machine learning models.

Announcing ML.NET 0.7 (Machine Learning .NET)

We’re excited to announce today the release of ML.NET 0.7 – the latest release of the cross-platform and open source machine learning framework for .NET developers (ML.NET 0.1 was released at //Build 2018). This release focuses on enabling better support for recommendation based ML tasks,

Announcing ML.NET 0.6 (Machine Learning .NET)

Today we’re announcing our latest monthly release: ML.NET 0.6! ML.NET is a cross-platform, open source machine learning framework for .NET developers. We want to enable every .NET developer to train and use machine learning models in their applications and services. If you haven’t tried ML.NET yet,

Announcing ML.NET 0.4

A few months ago we released ML.NET 0.1 at //Build 2018., ML.NET is a cross-platform, open source machine learning framework for .NET developers. We’ve gotten great feedback so far and would like to thank the community for your engagement as we continue to develop ML.NET together in the open.

.NET

.NET Framework October 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the October 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup and Cumulative Updates for .NET Framework.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.
ASP.NET

Addresses an issue with ValidationContext.MemberName when using custom DataAnnotation.ValidationAttribute.

CLR1

Reduces the risk of returning unordered ConstructorInfo’s from Type.GetConstructors().

Announcing .NET Core 3.1 Preview 1

Today, we’re announcing .NET Core 3.1 Preview 1. .NET Core 3.1 will be a small release focused on key improvements in Blazor and Windows desktop, the two big additions in .NET Core 3.0. It will be a long term support (LTS) release with an expected final ship date of December 2019.

Introducing .NET Core Windows Forms Designer Preview 1

Introducing .NET Core Windows Forms Designer Preview 1
We just released a GA version of .NET Core 3.0 that includes support for Windows Forms and WPF. And along with that release we’re happy to announce the first preview version of the Windows Forms Designer for .NET Core projects!

.NET Framework September 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup

We have released the September 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup and Cumulative Updates for .NET Framework for Windows 10
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.
BCL1

Addresses an issue that affects thread contention that occurs in BinaryFormatter.GetTypeInformation by using ConcurrentDictionary to handle multi-thread access.

ML.NET and Model Builder at .NET Conf 2019 (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited today to announce updates to Model Builder and improvements in ML.NET. You can learn more in the “What’s new in ML.NET?.” session at .NET Conf.
ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) for .NET developers.

Joining the .NET Foundation Maturity Model Pilot

Joining the .NET Foundation Maturity Model Pilot
The .NET Foundation is starting a new pilot program to increase quality and user confidence in open source projects, using a new project maturity model. We’ve been working with the Technical Review Action Group at the Foundation to help shape the program.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.0 and Entity Framework 6.3 General Availability

We are extremely excited to announce the general availability of EF Core 3.0and EF 6.3 on nuget.org.
The final versions of .NET Core 3.0 and ASP.NET Core 3.0 are also available now.
How to get EF Core 3.0
EF Core 3.0 is distributed exclusively as a set of NuGet packages.

Announcing F# 4.7

We’re excited to announce general availability of F# 4.7 in conjunction with the .NET Core 3.0 release! In this post, I’ll show you how to get started, explain everything in F# 4.7 and give you a sneak peek at what we’re doing for the next version of F#.

Announcing .NET Core 3.0

Announcing .NET Core 3.0
We’re excited to announce the release of .NET Core 3.0. It includes many improvements, including adding Windows Forms and WPF, adding new JSON APIs, support for ARM64 and improving performance across the board. C# 8 is also part of this release,

Release Candidate builds of Entity Framework Core 3.0 and Entity Framework 6.3 are now available

We previously said that preview 9 would be your last chance to test EF Core 3.0 and EF 6.3 before general availability. But it turns out that we made enough improvements to our libraries and across the whole of .NET Core 3.0 to justify publishing a release candidate build.

.NET Core

ML.NET and Model Builder at .NET Conf 2019 (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited today to announce updates to Model Builder and improvements in ML.NET. You can learn more in the “What’s new in ML.NET?.” session at .NET Conf.
ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework (Windows, Linux, macOS) for .NET developers.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.0 and Entity Framework 6.3 General Availability

We are extremely excited to announce the general availability of EF Core 3.0and EF 6.3 on nuget.org.
The final versions of .NET Core 3.0 and ASP.NET Core 3.0 are also available now.
How to get EF Core 3.0
EF Core 3.0 is distributed exclusively as a set of NuGet packages.

Announcing .NET Core 3.0

Announcing .NET Core 3.0
We’re excited to announce the release of .NET Core 3.0. It includes many improvements, including adding Windows Forms and WPF, adding new JSON APIs, support for ARM64 and improving performance across the board. C# 8 is also part of this release,

Release Candidate builds of Entity Framework Core 3.0 and Entity Framework 6.3 are now available

We previously said that preview 9 would be your last chance to test EF Core 3.0 and EF 6.3 before general availability. But it turns out that we made enough improvements to our libraries and across the whole of .NET Core 3.0 to justify publishing a release candidate build.

GC Perf Infrastructure – Part 0

In this blog entry and some future ones I will be showing off functionalities that our new GC perf infrastructure provides. Andy and I have been working on it (he did all the work; I merely played the consultant role). We will be open sourcing it soon and I wanted to give you some examples of using it and you can add these to your repertoire of perf analysis techniques when it’s available.

Announcing Entity Framework Core 3.0 Preview 9 and Entity Framework 6.3 Preview 9

Preview 9 your last chance to try Entity Framework Core 3.0 and Entity Framework 6.3 before we release the final versions later this month. Get a head start on everything that is new and please give us your feedback.

Announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 9

Today, we’re announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 9. Just like with Preview 8, we’ve focused on polishing .NET Core 3.0 for a final release and aren’t adding new features. If these final builds seem less exciting than earlier previews, that’s by design.

Hardware Intrinsics in .NET Core

Several years ago, we decided that it was time to support SIMD code in .NET. We introduced the System.Numerics namespace with Vector2, Vector3, Vector4, Vector<T>, and related types. These types expose a general-purpose API for creating, accessing, and operating on them using hardware vector instructions (when available).

Messaging Practices

This post is a collection of content from David Boike from the Particular.net blog calling out some common problems and solutions for building message based distributed systems. They are relevant to anyone building apps using messaging, and anyone building a Microservice based solution should definitely be interested in the first post about slimming down events.

.NET Core and systemd

In preview7 a new package was added to the `Microsoft.Extensions` set of packages that enables integration with systemd. For the Windows focused, systemd allows similar functionality to Windows Services, there is a post on how to do what we discuss here for Windows Services in this post.

.NET Framework

.NET Framework October 2019 Security and Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the October 2019 Security and Quality Rollup and Cumulative Updates for .NET Framework.
Security
No new security fixes. See September 2019 Security and Quality Rollup for the latest security updates.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.

.NET Framework September 2019 Security and Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the September 2019 Cumulative Update, Security and Quality Rollup, and Security Only Update for .NET Framework.
Security
CVE-2019-1142– .NET Framework Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability
An elevation of privilege vulnerability exists when the .NET Framework common language runtime (CLR) allows file creation in arbitrary locations.

.NET Framework August 30, 2019 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 version 1903

The August 2019 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 on Windows 10 version 1903 was released.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.

Addresses a crash that occurs after enumerating event logs.
Addresses a regression caused by the fix for the issue involving bindings with DataContext explicitly on the binding path.

.NET Framework August 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the August 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.
BCL1

Addresses a crash that occurs after enumerating event logs. [910822]

1 Base Class Library (BCL)
 
Getting the Update
The Preview of Quality Rollup is available via Windows Update,

Announcing ML.NET 1.2 and Model Builder updates (Machine Learning for .NET)

We are excited to announce ML.NET 1.2 and updates to Model Builder and the CLI. ML.NET is an open-source and cross-platform machine learning framework for .NET developers. ML.NET also includes Model Builder (a simple UI tool for Visual Studio) and the ML.NET CLI (Command-line interface) to make it super easy to build custom Machine Learning (ML) models using Automated Machine Learning (AutoML).

.NET Framework July 2019 Security and Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the July 2019 Cumulative Update, Security and Quality Rollup, and Security Only Update for .NET Framework.
Security
CVE-2019-1006 – WCF/WIF SAML Token Authentication Bypass Vulnerability
An authentication bypass vulnerability exists in Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) and Windows Identity Foundation (WIF),

.NET Framework June 27, 2019 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 version 1903

Today, we released the June 2019 Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 on Windows 10 version 1903.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.

Improves the memory allocation and cleanup scheduling behavior of the weak-event pattern.

.NET Framework June 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the June 2019 Preview of Quality Rollup.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.
WPF1

Addresses an issue in which applications that target .NET Framework 4.7 and later, or that set Switch.System.Windows.Controls.Grid.StarDefinitionsCanExceedAvailableSpace to “false,”

Migrating a Sample WPF App to .NET Core 3 (Part 2)

In part 1 of this blog series, I began the process of porting a sample WPF app to .NET Core. In that post, I described the .NET Core migration process as having four steps:

We previously went through the first two steps –

Migrating a Sample WPF App to .NET Core 3 (Part 1)

Olia recently wrote a post about how to port a WinForms app from .NET Framework to .NET Core. Today, I’d like to follow that up by walking through the steps to migrate a sample WPF app to .NET Core 3. Many of these steps will be familiar from Olia’s post,

Performance

GC Perf Infrastructure – Part 0

In this blog entry and some future ones I will be showing off functionalities that our new GC perf infrastructure provides. Andy and I have been working on it (he did all the work; I merely played the consultant role). We will be open sourcing it soon and I wanted to give you some examples of using it and you can add these to your repertoire of perf analysis techniques when it’s available.

Hardware Intrinsics in .NET Core

Several years ago, we decided that it was time to support SIMD code in .NET. We introduced the System.Numerics namespace with Vector2, Vector3, Vector4, Vector<T>, and related types. These types expose a general-purpose API for creating, accessing, and operating on them using hardware vector instructions (when available).

Performance Improvements in .NET Core 3.0

Take a tour through some of the many improvements, big and small, that have gone into the .NET Core 3.0 runtime and core libraries to make apps and services leaner and faster.

Making CPU configuration better for GC on machines with > 64 CPUs

If you are running Windows on a machine with 64 CPUs, you’ll need to use this feature called the CPU groups for your process to be able to use more than 64 CPUs. At some point in the far distant past,

You Should Never See This Callstack in Production

A customer who just experienced some server outage asked us for help as they thought it was due to some very long GC pauses. I thought this diagnostics exercise might be useful for other folks as well so I am sharing it with you.

Middle Ground between Server and Workstation GC

A long time ago I wrote about using Workstation GC on server applications when you have many instances of your server app running on the same machine. By default Server GC will treat the process as owning the machine so it uses all CPUs to do the GC work.

GLAD is available

End of last year I mentioned we wanted to provide an API for you to really investigate GC/managed memory related performance called GLAD. Well, the source finally got opened source on github. So GLAD is available. The repo is called PerfView but you actually just need the TraceEvent project (but it’s much easier to just build the whole solution then add the reference to the resulting Microsoft.Diagnostics.Tracing.TraceEvent.dll).

Large Object Heap Uncovered (an old MSDN article)

I wrote this article in 2008 and the MSDN website no longer has it so I am making it available here. Please note that it has been quite a while and some things related to LOH have changed quite a bit.

Security

.NET Core July 2019 Updates – 2.1.12 and 2.2.6

Today, we are releasing the .NET Core July 2019 Update. These updates contain security and reliability fixes. See the individual release notes for details on updated packages.
NOTE: If you are a Visual Studio user, there are MSBuild version requirements so use only the .NET Core SDK supported for each Visual Studio version.

.NET Core April 2019 Updates – 2.1.10 and 2.2.4

Today, we are releasing the .NET Core April 2019 Update. These updates contain security and reliability fixes. See the individual release notes for details on included fixes.

.NET Core 2.2.4 and .NET Core SDK 2.2.106 ( Download | Release Notes )
.NET Core 2.1.10 and .NET Core SDK 2.1.506 ( Download | Release Notes)

Security
Microsoft Security Advisory CVE-2019-0815: ASP.NET Core Denial of Service Vulnerability
A denial of service vulnerability exists in ASP.NET Core 2.2 where,

Submit to the Applied F# Challenge!

This post was written by Lena Hall, a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate at Microsoft.
F# Software Foundation has recently announced their new initiative — Applied F# Challenge! We encourage you to participate and send your submissions about F# on Azure through the participation form.

.NET Framework January 2019 Security and Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the January 2019 Security and Quality Rollup.
Security
CVE-2019-0545 – Windows Security Feature Bypass Vulnerability
This security update resolves a vulnerability in Microsoft .NET Framework that may cause an information disclosure that allows bypassing Cross-origin Resource Sharing (CORS) configurations.

.NET Framework December 2018 Security and Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the December 2018 Security and Quality Rollup.
Security
CVE-2018-8540 – Windows Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
This security update resolves a vulnerability in Microsoft .NET Framework that could allow remote code execution when Microsoft .NET Framework doesn’t validate input correctly.

.NET Framework November 2018 Security and Quality Rollup

Today, we are releasing the November 2018 Security and Quality Rollup.
Security
No new security fixes. See .NET Framework September 2018 Security and Quality Rollup for the latest security updates.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.

.NET Framework October 2018 Security and Quality Rollup

Today, we released the October 2018 Security and Quality Rollup.
Security
No new security fixes.  See .NET Framework September 2018 Security and Quality Rollup for the latest security update.
Quality and Reliability
This release contains the following quality and reliability improvements.

Uncategorized

Announcing .NET Core 3.0 Release Candidate 1

Today, we’re announcing .NET Core 3.0 Release Candidate 1. Just like with Preview 9, we’ve focused on polishing .NET Core 3.0 for a final release. We are now getting very, very close. We intend to release the final version on September 23 at .NET Conf.

Finalization implementation details

Years ago I wrote a document on making finalization scanning concurrent. At the time there was an internal team that was using finalization as a way to resurrect objects and putting them back in their cache. While we’ve always advised to folks that finalization was for releasing native resources I couldn’t fault this team for using it the way they did.

.NET Core September 2019 Updates – 2.1.13 and 2.2.7

Today, we are releasing the .NET Core September 2019 Update. These updates contain security and reliability fixes. See the individual release notes for details on updated packages.
NOTE: If you are a Visual Studio user, there are MSBuild version requirements so use only the .NET Core SDK supported for each Visual Studio version.

Announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 9

Today, we’re announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 9. Just like with Preview 8, we’ve focused on polishing .NET Core 3.0 for a final release and aren’t adding new features. If these final builds seem less exciting than earlier previews, that’s by design.

Join us for .NET Conf 2019, Sept 23-25

.NET Conf is back again this year and will be live streaming to a device near you September 23-25 on www.dotnetconf.net! .NET Conf is a FREE, 3 day virtual developer event co-organized by the .NET community and Microsoft. This year .NET Core 3.0 will launch at .NET Conf 2019!

How the .NET Team uses Azure Pipelines to produce Docker Images

Producing Docker images for .NET might not seem like that big of a deal.  Once you’ve got a Dockerfile defined, just run “docker build“ and “docker push“ and you’re done, right?  Then just rinse and repeat when new versions of .NET are released and that should be all that’s needed. 

Visual Studio Tips and Tricks: Increasing your Productivity for .NET

The .NET team is constantly thinking of new ways to make developers more productive. We’ve been working hard over the past year to take the feedback you’ve sent us and turn it into tools that you want! In this post I’ll cover some of the latest productivity features available in Visual Studio 2019 Preview.

.NET Framework 4.8 is available on Windows Update, WSUS and MU Catalog

We are happy to announce that Microsoft .NET Framework 4.8 is now available on Windows Update, Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) and Microsoft Update (MU) Catalog. This release includes quality and reliability fixes based on feedback since the .NET Framework 4.8 initial release.

Announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 8

Today, we are announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 8. Just like with Preview 7, we’ve focused on polishing .NET Core 3.0 for a final release and are not adding new features. If these final previews seem anti-climatic, that’s by design.
Download .NET Core 3.0 Preview 8 right now on Windows,

Calling all .NET desktop and mobile developers!

We would love to hear about your experience with building client applications in .NET. Your feedback will greatly help us to improve the .NET tooling and ensure our roadmap focuses on your needs. Participate in shaping the future of the .NET client development by taking this short survey (5 minutes to complete).

Visual Studio

The F# development home on GitHub is now dotnet/fsharp

TL;DR We’ve moved the F# GitHub repository from microsoft/visualfsharp to dotnet/fsharp, as specified in the corresponding RFC.

F# has a somewhat strange history in its name and brand. If we roll back the clocks to the year 2015, F# sort of had two identities.

Visual Studio 2019 .NET productivity

Your friendly neighborhood .NET productivity team (aka. Roslyn) focuses a lot on improving the .NET coding experience. Sometimes it’s the little refactorings and code fixes that really improve your workflow. You may have seen many improvements in the previews, but for all of you who were eagerly awaiting the GA release here’s a few features you may enjoy!

Announcing F# 4.6

We’re excited to announce general availability of F# 4.6 and the F# tools for Visual Studio 2019! In this post, I’ll show you how to get started, explain the F# 4.6 feature set, give you an update on the F# tools for Visual Studio,

Microsoft’s Developer Blogs are Getting an Update

In the coming days, we’ll be moving our developer blogs to a new platform with a modern, clean design and powerful features that will make it easy for you to discover and share great content. This week, you’ll see the Visual Studio,

Announcing F# 4.6 Preview

F# 4.6 is now fully released. See the announcement blog post for more.
We’re excited to announce that Visual Studio 2019 will ship a new version of F# when it releases: F# 4.6!
F# 4.6 is a smaller update to the F# language,

.NET Core tooling update for Visual Studio 2019 Preview 2

Another preview of Visual Studio 2019, another update on the cool stuff going into it!
We’re pleased to announce some updates to the .NET Core tools for Visual Studio 2019. You can try these changes out starting with Preview 2. We’d love for you to try out these new features and give us feedback.

.NET Core tooling update for Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9

Update! Starting with Visual Studio 2019, the option has moved to:
Tools Options Environment Preview Features
Old post for posterity:
Starting with Visual Studio 2017 version 15.9, we’ve changed how the Visual Studio tooling for .NET consumes .NET Core SDKs. Prior to this change,

Announcing F# 4.5

Today, we’re incredibly pleased to announce general availability of F# 4.5.
This post will walk through the changes in F# 4.5 (just like the preview post), then show some updates to F# tooling, and finally talk a bit about where what we’re thinking about for the next F# version.

F# language and tools update for Visual Studio 2017 version 15.7

We’re excited to share updates about changes to F# and F# tools which shipped with the Visual Studio 2017 version 15.7 release. Let’s dive in!
Type Providers now support .NET Standard
For those who aren’t familiar with Type Providers, they are a feature of F# which allow you to get IntelliSense for data.

F# language and tools update for Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6

With the release of Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6, we’re excited to share updates to the F# language and core library, F# tooling in Visual Studio, and infrastructure updates that concern OSS contributors. Let’s dive in!
F# language and core library updates
Some foundational changes for the F# language and core library have been made,

WPF

Migrating a Sample WPF App to .NET Core 3 (Part 2)

In part 1 of this blog series, I began the process of porting a sample WPF app to .NET Core. In that post, I described the .NET Core migration process as having four steps:

We previously went through the first two steps –

Migrating a Sample WPF App to .NET Core 3 (Part 1)

Olia recently wrote a post about how to port a WinForms app from .NET Framework to .NET Core. Today, I’d like to follow that up by walking through the steps to migrate a sample WPF app to .NET Core 3. Many of these steps will be familiar from Olia’s post,

Porting desktop apps to .NET Core

Since I’ve been working with the community on porting desktop applications from .NET Framework to .NET Core, I’ve noticed that there are two camps of folks: some want a very simple and short list of instructions to get their apps ported to .NET Core while others prefer a more principled approach with more background information.

Announcing .NET Core 3 Preview 4

Today, we are announcing .NET Core 3.0 Preview 4. It includes a chart control for Windows Forms, HTTP/2 support, GC updates to use less memory, support for CPU limits with Docker, the addition of PowerShell in .NET Core SDK Docker container images,

How to port desktop applications to .NET Core 3.0

In this post, I will describe how to port a desktop application from .NET Framework to .NET Core. I picked a WinForms application as an example. Steps for WPF application are similar and I’ll describe what needs to be done different for WPF as we go.

Open Sourcing XAML Behaviors for WPF

Today, we are excited to announce that we are open sourcing XAML Behaviors for WPF.
In the past, we open sourced XAML Behaviors for UWP which has been a great success and the Behaviors NuGet package has been downloaded over 500k times.

Are your Windows Forms and WPF applications ready for .NET Core 3.0?

Download Portability Analyzer (2.37 MB)
At Build 2018 we announced that we are enabling Windows desktop applications (Windows Forms and Windows Presentation Framework (WPF)) with .NET Core 3.0. You will be able to run new and existing Windows desktop applications on .NET Core and enjoy all the benefits that .NET Core has to offer,

.NET Framework 4.7.1 Accessibility and WPF Improvements

This post describes the new WPF and accessibility features and improvements in .NET Framework 4.7.1. You can try out these features by downloading the Developer Pack, described in the Welcome to the .NET Framework 4.7.1 Early Access blog post.
Accessibility improvements
.NET Framework 4.7.1 brings in a lot of accessibility improvements across different libraries to align with the broad Microsoft product accessibility goals.

.NET Framework July 2017 Quality Update for WPF

You can now install the July 2017 Quality Update for WPF. It applies to multiple Windows versions.
This update resolves known issue 4033488. It is recommended on machines that have installed the July 2017 Preview of Quality Rollup or the May 2017 Preview of Quality Rollup.

The Roadmap for WPF

When we introduced WPF back in 2006 (.NET 3.0), the response was absolutely phenomenal. Enterprises, ISV’s, and Microsoft Partners have made the technology central to their business, building amazing vertical solutions and mission critical applications for their customers. This momentum carries forward to today – 10% of all newly created projects in Visual Studio 2013 over the past 60 days are WPF.

XAML

Open Sourcing XAML Behaviors for WPF

Today, we are excited to announce that we are open sourcing XAML Behaviors for WPF.
In the past, we open sourced XAML Behaviors for UWP which has been a great success and the Behaviors NuGet package has been downloaded over 500k times.